Page 9 - Research and Eval revised
P. 9

7
LANGUAGE DIFFERENCES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SOCIAL- EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Oral language development plays an important role in the social- emotional development of children as it guides their connections with other children and adults (Mashburn, Justice, Downer, & Pianta, 2009). Language serves as a means for children to develop social interactions and cognitive development (Eisenberg, 1999; Vygotsky, 1978). Studies have identified the association between language deficiencies and negative behavior among children with speech and language difficulties (Fujiki, Brinton & Clarke, 2002). For instance, students with delayed language development exhibit negative behaviors due to their difficulty expressing themselves as they try to develop or maintain relationships. From this exclusion of peer group interactions, children have less opportunity to participate in peer group conversations, thereby further limiting their social-emotional development. Studies have found that language and social difficulties can occur from preschool through high school (Lindsay, Dockrell & Strand, 2007; Beitchman, et al, 2001).
In contrast with monolingual English-speaking students, bilingual students typically face the challenge of learning a second language when participating in early childhood programs employing English immersion or bilingual programming. Based on previous research for students with developmental delays, one may assume that bilingual students would be more likely to have fewer social- emotional skills in early childhood. However, Guerrero and his colleagues (2013) found that Mexican-American students did not present delays in social-emotional development in early childhood, even though they did show delays in cognitive development. In addition, Fuller (2014) found that bilingual (Spanish and English) students show just as strong, or stronger, social-emotional development in comparison to monolingual (English) peers. Although he could not determine the processes that contributed to stronger social-emotional development, he found Hispanic
Oral language development plays an important role in the social emotional development of children as it guides their connections with other children and adults. Based on previous research for students with developmental delays, one may assume that bilingual students would be more likely to have fewer social-emotional skills in early childhood. However, the previous research found that bilingual (Spanish and English) students showed strong, or stronger, social-emotional development in comparison to monolingual (English only) peers. Multiple factors may contribute to this difference, including family, teacher, and peer relationships.


































































































   7   8   9   10   11